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“I was in a rush to do things as a young kid,” says APA chief Rob Wheals.

The best advice I have ever been given: don’t be in a rush

Rob Wheals is the chief executive of gas pipeline operator APA Group. He answers our CEO Q&A.

  • Colin Packham
The energy transition must be measured and planned, APA CEO Rob Wheals says.

Meet the ultra marathon runner with a timing challenge

APA Group CEO Rob Wheals enjoys a challenge, whether it’s ultramarathons or paragliding – but Australia’s energy transition may be his biggest obstacle.

  • Colin Packham
Focus generic

Four quick hacks to boost your focus at work

Ever find yourself drifting off during the middle of the day? Three experts share their top tips on how to regain your work mojo quickly.

  • Natasha Boddy
Australia’s fire season could extend by between 11 and 36 days by 2100.

How directors and executives are failing to protect their businesses

“Climate change is permanent, and it is going to be disorderly,” says Geoff Summerhayes. “We need to think about how we’re going to live in a warmer world.”

  • Sally Patten
Robert Spurway has been eating Weetbix for breakfast since he was two years old.

The best advice I have ever received: have no regrets (and fail fast)

Robert Spurway is the chief executive of GrainCorp. He answers our CEO Q&A.

  • James Thomson
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This Month

Robert Spurway is a food industry lifer.

Why food will be a bigger crisis than energy ever will be

Helped by bumper harvests, Robert Spurway has quietly turned around the fortunes of the grain and edible oils business in the past two years. Now he has a new mission.  

  • James Thomson

June

Pitcher Partners’ Charlie Viola has an early morning personal training session with coach Jackson Harding.

Here’s what it’s like to train at Australia’s most exclusive gym

Sydney’s Lockeroom has a limit of 100 members and targets only high-flyers, making for valuable networking opportunities. Take a look inside.

  • Lucy Dean
Pauline Blight-Johnston says that when people are feeling vulnerable, don’t always behave in way models suggest.

Genworth’s CEO reveals the best advice she’s ever received

If you do what you love, you’ll have an impact, says Pauline Blight-Johnston, who almost went into medicine but became an actuary. She answers our CEO Q&A.

  • Jemima Whyte
Genworth chief Pauline Blight-Johnston says it’s the job of insurers to pay claims.

Meet the CEO hell-bent on helping people into the housing market

Genworth Financial’s chief executive, Pauline Blight-Johnston says she’s learnt as much - if not more - about leadership in chairing a private girls’ school than she has in all her years in business.

  • Jemima Whyte
Former ANZ Mike Smith has helped form the Mentor List for former CEOs to mentor current ones.

Plenty of CEOs have ‘war stories’, but this boss was shot at work

Former ANZ chief executive Mike Smith is helping mentor the next generation of leaders. One of his tales involves a fateful day in Argentina in 1999.

  • Patrick Durkin
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Nicole Liu started her own health tech company called Kin Fertility

Why I quit the corporate world to go it alone

Five entrepreneurs reveal why they stopped climbing the corporate ladder to launch their own start-ups.

  • Natasha Boddy and Sally Patten
Victoria Mills

Does coaching make you a better boss?

Searches for such training on Google have increased 170 per cent in the past five years. Here’s why more leaders are turning to it.

  • Natasha Boddy
Paul O’Sullivan swims and plays competitive water polo

The best advice the ANZ chairman has been given

Paul O’Sullivan, who chairs the bank and Optus, says the need to follow the customer has been his top tip. He answers our Q&A.

  • Sally Patten
Vittoria Shortt runs ASB in New Zealand and is considered to be in the running to become the CEO of a big four bank.

The women in the running to be the next big bank CEO

The pool of senior female bankers who could step up to run one of the major lenders has never been bigger.

  • Sally Patten
Company director Ann Sherry and Lynas CEO Amanda Lacaze at the AFR 70th Platinum dinner.

The invisible networks that bind the ‘directors’ club’

From pro bono corporate advisor Adara Partners to the AFL and Australia’s top universities, the people at the top of these organisations are all closely linked.

  • Patrick Durkin
Christine O’Reilly, director of BHP Group, ANZ and Stockland has topped this year’s BOSS list of most powerful directors.

Women top Australia’s most powerful and influential directors

Two women have topped the BOSS lists of most powerful and influential directors, putting two women at the top of the long-running lists for the first time.

  • Patrick Durkin and Sally Patten

Top female directors warn on skills, inflation and climate

The board members also point to their growing workload as they try to meet the rising expectations of regulators, investors, the community and employees.

  • Sally Patten and Patrick Durkin

May

Paul O’Sullivan says ANZ is taking a “fairly radical approach” to technology transformation.

When people look at ANZ Plus, they don’t see whole picture: chairman

Paul O’Sullivan is concerned the extent of the transformation program is not well understood.

  • Sally Patten
Angus Armour says the election sends a critical message to boards around trust.

Directors ignore the Liberals’ rout at their peril

Some MPs and senators were heavily punished last weekend for failing to gauge the mood of the community. Others were rewarded for their ability to do so.

  • Sally Patten
Scott Stein says many leaders falsely believe they can do the task more quickly themselves.

Don’t know how to delegate effectively? Follow this four-step plan

The most common mistake is to start by handing off a task, leaving it with the person you’ve given it to and waiting to see the results.

  • Scott Stein
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Boomerang employees

Quit your job? Why your old boss wants you back

The days of workers being seen as disloyal for leaving a company are long gone as a growing number of organisations lure boomerang employees back.

  • Natasha Boddy and Tess Bennett
Graham Chipchase, London-based CEO of pallet company Brambles.

Best advice I’ve had: Make people feel they’re asking great questions

Graham Chipchase is the London-based CEO of ASX-listed logistics company Brambles. He answers our CEO Q&A.

  • Hans van Leeuwen
Steve Pell says it is hard for a CEO to overinvest in the relationship with the chairman.

Four ways CEOs can get directors on their side

An obstacle to a good relationship with directors is the chief executive’s tendency to grumble about the board’s lack of industry knowledge.

  • Sally Patten
Graham Chipchase might have a taste for turbulence: as a teenager he wanted to fly fighter jets.

Why this CEO reckons boring is good

Graham Chipchase wanted to fly fighter jets but settled for the logistics trade. In this time of turbulence, though, running Brambles is anything but dull.

  • Hans van Leeuwen
Ross McEwan has a reputation for being straightforward.

How Ross McEwan is turning around National Australia Bank

The bank chief executive believes slick software is a tool to help human bankers better support customers, not as an end in itself.

  • James Eyers and Ayesha de Kretser