Skip to navigationSkip to contentSkip to footerHelp using this website - Accessibility statement
Advertisement

Working from home

Today

Workers who started their careers at the end of the 20th century assumed “going to work” meant “going to the office”.

Why CEOs are so WTF about WFH

One hot topic is guaranteed to press the buttons of US bosses: working from home.

  • Gillian Tett

This Month

Health Minister Mary-Anne Thomas.

Appetite for COVID-19 rules wanes

Victoria has rejected medical advice to reimpose mask mandates and the federal government will scrap free rapid antigen tests.

  • Natasha Boddy, Gus McCubbing and AAP

What to do with empty office parks, a hidden COVID casualty

Yes, downtown offices are struggling. But there is a different kind of emptiness in suburban settings that were already isolated and lightly populated by design.

  • Emily Badger

June

A five-bedroom house in the Brisbane satellite town of Samford Village designed by Bligh Graham Architects won the top Queensland awards for residential and sustainable architecture. 

Award-winning Brisbane house redefines working from home

A home on a residential block in Samford Valley includes an office studio that allows the owners to completely separate their professional and domestic lives.

  • Scotia Whiting and Michael Bleby
Kim McKay the founder of communications firm Klick X, considered moving to a four day work week in 2019 but decided it wasn’t all it was cracked up to be and chose a fully remote and flexible workplace policy instead.

Why this company rejected the four-day work week

New research shows flexibility still trumps a shorter working week - although employees say they’d be happy with either perk.

  • Tess Bennett
Advertisement
working harder doesn’t seem to be making us richer, it does appear to be making us sicker

Why are we all working so hard?

The intensification of work doesn’t seem to be making us richer, but it does appear to be making us sicker.

  • Sarah O'Connor
JPMorgan Chase & Co

Jamie Dimon on markets, retirement, crypto and WFH

The JP Morgan boss on why 2023 will be unpredictable, why he’s still as energised as ever, and why he refuses to ‘hyperventilate’ about working from home.

  • James Thomson

Here’s why Atlassian thinks the WFH debate is missing the point

Should we pine for the good old days of working 9-5, or do we invest in creating tomorrow’s good old days? I know which one I’m choosing.

  • Dom Price
Stephanie Atanasovski says she loves going in to the office for collaboration.

Inside Cotton On’s secret HQ

For the first time in nearly a decade, Cotton On lifts the lid on its New York-style headquarters, where staff can get subsidised childcare, spa treatments, and free fitness classes.

  • Natasha Boddy
Burnet Institute chief operating officer Mark Tennent, left, and Studio Tate director Alex Hopkins in one of the new breakout spaces at the research institute’s office.

Pandemic is keeping epidemiologists out of the office

The on-again, off-again disruptions of COVID-19 are creating uncertainty about the longer-term use of the traditional office – especially for disease experts.

  • Michael Bleby

Why early is the new fashionably late

The pandemic has ushered in a new emphasis on punctuality in daily life.

  • Katherine Rosman
Australia’s fair work system needs updating to reflect the rise of flexible work.

As flexible work grows, so does unpaid overtime

New research warns that the Fair Work system is failing to keep up with the increase in flexible work.

  • Natasha Boddy
Elon Musk has told Tesla staff to return to the office.

Musk orders Tesla staff to return to office or leave

The billionaire reportedly sent an email telling workers to spend 40 hours a week in the office, and if they didn’t show up: “We will assume you have resigned.”

  • Ryan Mac
Cisco’s Ben Dawson.

How working from home has saved the average Australian $10,000

It has made people happier, healthier and wealthier, as they saved $216 a week while they cut spending on petrol, commuting, food and entertainment.

  • Natasha Boddy
Vicki Elias took five days of paid grandparents leave when her granddaugher was born.

Grandparents’ leave: how workplaces are becoming more family-friendly

When Vicki Elias’ granddaughter Frankie was born earlier this year, her employer Investa gave her a week of paid leave to care for her grandchild.

  • Natasha Boddy
Advertisement

May

Peta Wolff, Founder of I’ve Got Time for That on the Gold Coast.

Companies ditch their executive assistants for the virtual variety

Demand for virtual assistant jobs have increased by 20 per cent during the January to April quarter, as more companies look to get rid of offices and move to permanent remote work.

  • Campbell Kwan
PR people have always cold-called, as have pollsters and sales people from all manner of companies.

The cold call is back and worse than ever

We all had a break from nuisance calls during the pandemic. Now they seem even more intrusive.

  • Pilita Clark
Zoom shares have plunged.

Zoom’s horror 85pc share crash may have gone too far

Shares in the video-conferencing software have cratered, wiping out about $US135 billion ($189 billion) of market value. Analysts are calling for a rally.

  • Subrat Patnaik
Premium suites: Office tenants returning from the pandemic increasingly want fully connected space they can begin working in immediately, GPT says.

Landlords boost proptech spend as workers return to the office

Workers are moving back to office buildings, but it is a harder task than expected. Employers are spending more to make their buildings appeal to people and function better.

  • Michael Bleby
Do you speak up in meetings, or are you the silent type?

Return-to-office plans unravel as workers rebel

From Wall Street to Silicon Valley, even the most inflexible bosses are softening their return-to-office expectations.

  • Matthew Boyle