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Auckland.

NZ inflation rises to 7.3pc, its highest in 32 years

Inflation quickened to 7.3 per cent, fuelling bets the central bank will need to continue raising interest rates aggressively.

  • Matthew Brockett
A memorial outside the Robb Elementary School in Texas.

‘Chaos’: How 400 police failed to stop Texas school shooting

The first report into the mass shooting in May found police failed to prioritise saving innocent lives over their own safety.

  • Updated
  • Jake Bleiberg and Paul J. Weber

The sultan, his family and a $22b Malaysia oil dispute

The heirs to the last ruler of Sulu have seized state-owned energy assets in a lawsuit that dates back to colonial times.

  • Leo Lewis

Europe battles wildfires as heatwave causes hundreds of deaths

More than 1000 fatalities have been attributed to the nearly week-long heatwave in Portugal and Spain.

  • Guillermo Martinez

Donor slump signals Trump’s grip on GOP may be slipping

The former president’s camp says anything that suggests he is not raising money at an ‘unparalleled pace’ is fake news.

  • Jason Lange and Alexandra Ulmer

Russia’s war in Ukraine punches a hole in G20’s power

There were no walkouts this time but Russia’s presence at the G20 finance meeting in Bali again got in the way of a unified approach to deepening economic crises.

  • Updated
  • Emma Connors

Opinion & Analysis

Is China stumbling into its own mortgage disaster?

The Chinese authorities’ drift on managing bad property debts feels eerily like the impending subprime crisis in 2007.

Shuli Ren

Contributor

Eclectic Tory contenders lack Boris Johnson’s broad appeal

The issue for the UK Conservatives isn’t race or gender. It is a combination of economics and the ability to connect with the spectrum of British society.

France has run out of Dijon mustard and it’s no laughing matter

The mustard makers of Burgundy have been hit by a triple catastrophe that has cut supplies of the seeds of Brassica juncea used for the Dijon product.

Victor Mallett

Contributor

Biden’s outreach to Middle East dictators is about China and Russia

During painful encounters Arab strongmen, Joe Biden returned to one reason for renewing ties with allies on the wrong side of the struggle battle between democracy and autocracy.

David E. Sanger and Peter Baker

Contributor

From the Financial Times

The sultan, his family and a $22b Malaysia oil dispute

The heirs to the last ruler of Sulu have seized state-owned energy assets in a lawsuit that dates back to colonial times.

  • Leo Lewis

France has run out of Dijon mustard and it’s no laughing matter

The mustard makers of Burgundy have been hit by a triple catastrophe that has cut supplies of the seeds of Brassica juncea used for the Dijon product.

  • Victor Mallett

Why Larry Fink is more worried about food prices than oil

The Wall Street titan and boss of the world’s largest fund manager, BlackRock, says the destruction of arable land during the Ukraine war has dangerous global consequences.

  • Brooke Masters and Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson
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More From Today

Is China stumbling into its own mortgage disaster?

The Chinese authorities’ drift on managing bad property debts feels eerily like the impending subprime crisis in 2007.

  • Shuli Ren

Yesterday

A Russian Grad rocket launcher fires weapons at Ukrainian troops at an undisclosed location.

Kremlin unshackles troops after Ukraine gets precision rockets

Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu has ordered Russian troops to intensify attacks in all sectors of the war, signalling the Kremlin was ending an operational pause.

  • Andrew E. Kramer and Steven Erlanger
Regardless of the scandals, Boris Johnson was one of the most substantial prime ministers of the past 120 years.

Eclectic Tory contenders lack Boris Johnson’s broad appeal

The issue for the UK Conservatives isn’t race or gender. It is a combination of economics and the ability to connect with the spectrum of British society.

  • Alexander Downer
A perfect storm of climate change, a European war and COVID-19 have left the French scrambling for alternatives to Dijon mustard.

France has run out of Dijon mustard and it’s no laughing matter

The mustard makers of Burgundy have been hit by a triple catastrophe that has cut supplies of the seeds of Brassica juncea used for the Dijon product.

  • Victor Mallett
The British summer, set to be one of the hottest on record, is offering no relief from COVID-19.

Europe shows latest COVID-19 wave is not just a winter thing

Nearly 3.5 million people in Britain were infected in the first week of July, but the public and politicians are relaxed or indifferent about a new COVID-19 wave sweeping Europe in the middle of summer.

  • Hans van Leeuwen
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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, right, greets US President Joe Biden with a fist bump in Jeddah.

Biden fails to win security, oil commitments at Arab summit

Joe Biden has been unable to get Arab nations to pump more oil or make progress on a security deal that could include Israel.

  • Steve Holland, Aziz El Yaakoubi, Jarrett Renshaw and Maha El Dahan
Protesters make use of the swimming pool in the Sri Lankan president’s official residence in Colombo.

What Sri Lanka reveals about the risks in emerging markets

A number of developing economies face growing pressure from soaring energy and food costs and a stronger US dollar.

  • Martin Sandbu and Jonathan Wheatley and John Reed
Larry Fink's BlackRock can do the things governments need right now.

Why Larry Fink is more worried about food prices than oil

The Wall Street titan and boss of the world’s largest fund manager, BlackRock, says the destruction of arable land during the Ukraine war has dangerous global consequences.

  • Brooke Masters and Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, right, greets US President Joe Biden with a fist bump in Jeddah.

Biden’s outreach to Middle East dictators is about China and Russia

During painful encounters Arab strongmen, Joe Biden returned to one reason for renewing ties with allies on the wrong side of the struggle battle between democracy and autocracy.

  • David E. Sanger and Peter Baker
Donald Trump and his then wife, Ivana, pose outside the Federal Courthouse after she was sworn in as a United States citizen in 1988.

Ivana Trump died from ‘blunt impact’ injuries

Police had been looking into whether former president Donald Trump’s first wife fell down the stairs. New York’s medical examiner ruled her death an accident.

  • Carolyn Thompson
Tony Davis testing the Model Y.

10 of the best opinion reads from this week

Here’s 10 long reads to enjoy: meet the Aussie scientist who knows how to make green steel; find out what the new Tesla SUV is like; and why the extended weekend is on the rise

This Month

Jumbo Floating Restaurant was being towed to Southeast Asia before it capsized.

Surprise tightening in Asia ups pressure on dovish central banks

Central banks in Asia that remained dovish even in the face of soaring inflation may see their resolve tested after a surprise tightening by peers in the region.

  • Low De Wei
Tony Davis testing the Model Y.

10 long reads for the weekend

Here’s 10 long reads to enjoy: meet the Aussie scientist who knows how to make green steel; find out what the new Tesla SUV is like; and why the extended weekend is on the rise

Deputy Prime Minister and Defence Minister Richard Marles with US Secretary of Defence Lloyd Austin.

Subs would be built faster with Australian investment in US shipyards

Richard Marles is open to co-crewing and co-flagging America’s Los Angeles class of submarines, but investing in new shipyards in America might be a step too far for the Defence Minister.

  • Matthew Cranston
People run in the street with fighting bulls at the San Fermin Festival in Pamplona.

After a pandemic hiatus, the bulls are running again in Pamplona

Tens of thousands of visitors attended the festival in northern Spain that includes the famous and chaotic races.

  • Derrick Bryson Taylor and Francheska Melendez
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Joe Biden’s re-election prospects will depend on whether the US can avoid recession.

Why the US may avoid a ‘real’ recession

Many Americans believe the country is already in – or very close to – a recession, conventionally defined as two consecutive quarters of negative growth. But are they right?

  • Matthew Cranston
Still in the fight: Penny Mordaunt, Liz Truss, Kemi Badenoch, Rishi Sunak and Tom Tugendhat.

Britain’s next leader probably won’t be a white man

The diverse candidates have climbed in reach of the Conservative Party leadership by ignoring identity zealots telling them the system was loaded against them.

  • Theodore Dalrymple
Germany fears Russia will cut off

How Australia can ease Germany’s energy emergency

Australia has a reputation as a safe and reliable energy supplier. So, can it help meet Germany’s demand for energy sources that substitute Russian deliveries?

  • Andrew McCathie
Still in the fight: Penny Mordaunt, Liz Truss, Kemi Badenoch, Rishi Sunak and Tom Tugendhat.

Knife fight in a phone box: the Tory leadership election gets personal

While the rest of Britain looks on, a tiny cabal of Conservative MPs tears itself apart in a quest for one thing: the keys to Downing Street.

  • Hans van Leeuwen
Joe Biden and Israel’s President Isaac Herzog speak with Holocaust survivors at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial Museum in Jerusalem.

Biden defends Saudi trip, says human rights on the agenda

The US president would not commit to asking the Crown Prince about the 2018 murder of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

  • Nick Allen and Abbie Cheeseman